Posts Tagged ‘Fun’

Evictions and Unauthorized Practice of Law

October 22nd, 2022

A. Right to Proceed Pro Se

In Ohio,Guest Posting a person can always represent himself in court. This is called appearing “pro se” and is a common (though unwise) practice where very little is at stake, such as in small claims courts around the state. Why is it unwise? The two main reasons are that attorneys who regularly perform evictions will be a great deal more familiar with the ins and outs of the law than the lay person. Secondly, an attorney will see the case objectively, and a dispassionate eye is a more effective observer of events than the landlord who may see things subjectively, having his vision clouded by emotions.

B. Representing Other Persons or Entities

But to represent another person or another entity (such as a company, a trust, or an LLC), you must be certified by the Ohio Supreme Court to practice law or you are engaging in the unauthorized practice of law. This rule affects landlords whose property is owned by a corporation or managed by a rental company. Owning a property in a corporate form has become very popular lately as a way of limiting the landlord’s personal liability. This way, if the landlord is sued because of an injury at the property, the most he can lose is the value of the property (assuming his insurance isn’t enough to cover it). His personal assets cannot be touched.

In the past, some landlords tried to file evictions via their employees, or tried to file the actions themselves on behalf of the corporation owning the property. They reasoned that since they were the 100 percent owners of all the shares of the corporation, they should be able to represent it in court. The problem was that these employees and corporate shareholders were not attorneys.

Six Teachers From Spain to Teach in the Ohio Schools

March 28th, 2022

Susan Tave Zelman, superintendent of public instruction for the schools in Ohio, welcomed six visiting teachers from Spain, who will be teaching in the schools in Ohio this coming school year.

Last year, Ohio signed a memorandum of understanding with the Spanish Ministry of Education and Science, Spain’s sponsor for the visiting international teacher program. The ministry started the program in 1986 and has since provided 1,500 visiting teachers to the United States. This is the first year of participation for the Ohio schools.

Spanish language educators have been in short supply in the schools in Ohio, yet they are in critical demand in order to prepare Ohio schools’ students for their future and the new millennium. With only 200-225 foreign language teachers being graduated from the 25 or so Ohio colleges and universities, the Ohio schools see the visiting teacher program as a plus for everyone.

The visiting educators will teach their native language, culture and history to middle and high school students, while helping the school districts to expand or maintain their Spanish language programs. The teachers will, in return, gain a first-hand experience of American culture, improve their own English language proficiency, and develop new relationships that hopefully will be lasting ones.

The Ohio schools’ students will benefit greatly from the program, too. The National Governor’s Association already has called for state public school systems to expose their students to the global world in which they now live. The association believes that global thinking and learning is essential in the future of today’s students. The Ohio schools are accepting this challenge by participating in the visiting teacher program to ensure their students learn to speak another language, as well as understand and appreciate another culture.

Whether Ohio schools’ students work in the United States or abroad in the future, the exposure today will benefit them tomorrow. Of the U.S. population, 12 percent are Hispanic. Ohio’s own Hispanic community has grown from approximately 140,000 in 1990 to about 217,000 in 2000. Some states, such as Florida, Texas and California, have even greater communities of Hispanic residents.

Currently, only 45 percent of students across the nation take a foreign language in high school. Ohio’s Governor Taft has proposed that all Ohio schools’ students be required to take at least two years of foreign language study, though it is not yet a requirement.

The six educators that will teach in Ohio during the 2006-2007 school year are:

o Maria Espada Blanco from Madrid, Spain. Maria will teach in the Constellation Community Schools in Parma, Cuyahoga County;

o Raquel Alonso Cuadrado from Palencia, Spain. Raquel will teach in the Beaver Local in Columbiana County;

o Maria Isabel (Maribel) Prado Millan from Cadiz, Spain. Maribel will teach in the Madison Local School District in Lake County;

o Maria Rebeca Tejero Olivares from Gibraleon, Spain. Maria will teach in the Preparing Academic Leaders Academy in Maple Heights, Cuyahoga County;

o Pablo Hernandez Rodriguez from Salamanca, Spain. Pablo will teach in the Meigs Local Schools in Meigs County; and

o Yolanda Coleto Salas from Madrid, Spain. Yolanda will teach in Trotwood-Madison High School in Montgomery County.